Se7en deadly sins of online – PRIDE

We are uncovering w00tonomy’s take on the se7en deadly sins . These are the vices we’ve seen drag businesses into the express elevator to redesign hell. Going down!

PRIDE – just expecting your site to work

mission accomplished

Remember the film The Field of Dreams ? In it, Kevin Costner was told that if he turned a field into a baseball pitch dead players would turn up to play on it. He was told: "Build it and they will come."

In the online world, baby, they don’t. They really really don’t. You have to go and get them with the content you have to market, no matter how much good work you’ve done.

The Information architecture may have been well designed; the creatives and navigation structure may have been user tested and the stakeholders may have all signed it off. No doubt, the content management system is industry standard and you bet it’s flexible enough to cater for future developments. It goes without saying the site is 3A, XHTML and W3C compliant to boot. Your analytics package will be in place ready to measure the large number of customers who will come to admire your work. You are all so very very proud as your new site launches. Look upon our works, ye mighty, and despair. You have built it and they will come.

But they don’t and after a short peak of modest initial interest the traffic begins to die off. It dies because you haven’t attracted anyone to your site with interesting stuff .

The reality is you live and die by your content . No matter what your business, when you are online you are in the content publishing business. The content your beielve in and want to market is the only long term determinant of the success of your site.

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Se7en deadly sins of online – SLOTH

We are uncovering w00tonomy’s take on the se7en deadly sins and the virtues of Content Marketing. These are the vices we’ve seen drag businesses into the express elevator to redesign hell. Going down!

SLOTH – failure to plan beyond launch

slothful homer This is the sin of indifference to your content and failure to make the most of what you have to market. It always happens after the dust of the project delivery has settled. The hustle and bustle of the project review meetings are a distant memory of post-it notes and cheap cofee. A good job has been done by one and all. But nobody has planned for what to do beyond the launch date.

Thinking and acting like a publisher is essential for seeing beyond the go-live date. Content marketing means a delivered site is just a tool to get started on the job of attracting an audience.